Joadre

Equal opportunities for all is bullshit!

Have we been shared equal portion of skills and abilities? Can we choose where and when we are born? If you are saying “no” to these two questions, then please agree with me that soliciting for equal rights is all bullshit! We should be soliciting for more rights for some specific group of people, in other to make them equal as fast as possible.

Its 6pm and I am invited to an event where the main goal is to solicit for equal rights. I would not mention the event as I am fully aware that the organisers meant well and are good intended. But here is my thoughts on the trends of equal rights. How can the solution to issues on gender and migration be solved through creating equal rights for all? Pardon me, but I think this ignorant! If you disagree, I am happy to read your reasons beneath in the comment section, or you can send me an email via network@joadre.com.

Let us focus on migration for a minute, because Gender is for another day. I would totally agree to share equal rights to migrants from Syria and migrants from Germany to Austria, if both migrants where born with the same opportunity, grew up with the same choices, learned the same ethical values within the same cultural space and emigrated also based on the same reason. Actually, lets go deeper. No two individual is born with the same ability, right? In the same class you have fast learners and slower learners. Now pardon me to use the word “slower” in its positive sense, or scrap it. Lets say less faster learners. Now these different students go into the world with these different abilities. So it is very hard to use the term equal when you address both with diverse abilities.

Promoting Equity to get Equality!

Lets adapt the word Equity rights, which simply means providing opportunities to make all equal, NOT giving them equal opportunities. There is a significant difference. Here is a rather deep example into history; descendants of people who have suffered decades of slavery should be given “much more” opportunities to become equal in the society. These opportunities would address every aspect of physical and phycological trauma imposed on them from generation to generation. These opportunities would address economic aspects such as compensations, such as giving back ownership to living descendants. When all such measures have been put in place, then we can talk about making equal right effective.

When I got to Austria, I had the opportunity to further my studies just like any young Austrian student who just completed secondary school. In this area, you could say I had equal rights.  I did not have a financial track record in Austria that would help me secure a student loan. I did not have relatives and parents who could support financially. My network was reduced to minus 2. I could not speak the language. Yes, some of these factors would be true to some Austrian born students as well. Hence no one has equal opportunities! In the first 1 2months, I was occupied with classic migration and integration problems, which I would rather now call “challenges”. I spent the first 12 months trying to master these challenges, which means that any Austrian-born student could complete their education faster than I did. They could start working and saving up to a good pension, which seems to be a very clear life mission here!

Most Syrian migrants fled the war. Many German migrants are economic or social migrants, just like many Nigerian migrants as well. But now it gets tricky! It is almost impossible to have a Nigerian economic migrant because he would not get a visa at all for the same motive like the German migrant. So you see, the basis for global interaction is on status quo “non-equality”. If we strive more for equity rights, we might finally get to equal rights. Fighting for equity would mean that some people would have to admit that they are privileged. It would mean that some groups would have to admit that their wealth is constructed based on the disadvantages of others. But lets call it a day here and check out what I picked out this week from our sustainable fashion and accessories online. Remember to share your comments and thoughts, questions and take on my article.

My weeks pick

Hand crafted batik shopper with crushed blue patterns

I cannot lie, that these colours are so beautiful and intensive. I practically wake up every morning into my atelier to see the colors of this bag. It spices up my mood and I keep it right in front of my work table for more inspiration. It is a classic shopper bag we designed with Ayoola from Jmuacouture. Here is a little insight in the development of this bag. We started our training program about 3 year sago and decided that any tailor or producer who could come up with their own design and production plan, are allowed to create products under their own brand name.

Ayoola, is one of such producers who enthusiastically worked so hard to realise this bag design. We currently have just 3 pieces in stock, but more are in the production now being made. If you want this bag or know someone you will like to give it to, then be rest assured that you are creating an impact >  more young producers get access to our training program. The bag has an inner pocket with zip, another inner pocket and an outer pocket at the back with zip as well. Yes, a very large laptop can get into the bag. I love the shopper because its a casual colourful piece to spice up any grey-black outfit. Thank you so much for reading this very very long article. Hope to have you subscribe to my weekly blog. Wishing you a lovely Friday and a great weekend rest, Joana

*I really want my German speaking fans to grab as much from this article, thanks to google translate, we have something readable in German.

Hi its me Joana, please subscribe to my Joadre weekly blog to stay updated and get my fresh articles right in your mail box.

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