Dreams Drown In The Mediterranean – migration.

Saturday the 18. of April 2015. A fisher boat sailing over 900 migrants 50km from Tripoli to Lampedusa. Human beings stocked by smugglers either helping them flee adversity or profiting from their adversity. Whichever way you see it, people are dying. A week before, same happened. About 400 people drowned migrating to Europe. Reckless governance push people to drown. Sealed walls of Europe let people drown. Greedy smugglers and traffickers lure people to drown. Now, there is a political grief, a theatrical parade of platonic emotions. Then the moral obligation to be silent for a minute or more, to pay homage to the dead. What about their families, their relatives, their children, their dreams, their hopes, their friends ready to embark on the same journey again and again? What about a minute or more to pay homage to sustainable solutions? It is only human to hunt a safe future, but for many it is a do or drown.

Sincerely ask yourself, would anyone intentionally choose the Mediterranean sea to die? How much doubt and confusion must have ravelled the mind? How much hope and prayers did they take as souvenirs for the journey? Is creating peace and future prospects in disadvantaged communities our biggest human challenge or is it the dreadful fear to loose the power over the poor? As much as it is a global political obligation, it is also an individual responsibility to find ways in which our daily activities can add to a safer world for all.

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The story of a migrant

We at Joadre have embarked on our own journey, starting with 10 women in Nigeria, we begin to redefine the way we wear clothes, the way we live our lives. Many social and business entrepreneurs are doing same and even greater. What about you? Still contemplating on what impact you could create?

Here is a story of a Nigerian man who migrated to Lybia years ago but got stuck in the war zone. “I couldn’t go back to Nigeria – the way south was blocked – so I met some people in Tripoli who said they knew how to get to Italy. They took us to a beach outside the city where there were hundreds of people camped out, all waiting to get on a boat. Some were from Syria, or Algeria, or Egypt. But most were from west or east Africa!…When I set out on the journey from Tripoli, I had no idea how dangerous it would be. I had only been on a boat once before in my life. In fact, I can’t even swim……..How is it that my life here in Berlin is worse than under Muammar Gaddafi’s dictatorship?” Read the full story on The guardian

Follow me on Instagram @iamjoadre.

Cheers, Joana

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